Machine Shop Safety Update by Muhammad Akram

Since the tragic incident at Yale University in which a student lost her life while working alone with dangerous equipment, EH&S has been working closely with Shop Supervisors from various academic departments to reinforce University-wide machine shop safety practices. The Shop Safety Work Group, established to complete this task, has formulated a broad policy that requires machine shop users to follow basic safety rules, and to complete both general shop safety and machine-specific trainings prior to using any equipment. Shop Supervisors will implement this program and ensure that each user is provided appropriate training before the use of any equipment. Access to an academic shop will be denied without completion of both trainings, or if it is found that a user has violated safety rules.
The general shop safety training is available via Rascal (https://www.rascal.columbia.edu) and is listed as Course TC0600, “Shop Safety Training”. The presentation covers basic safety principles that must be followed while working in any shop or laboratory containing heavy machinery, information on how to use various tools safely, and what to do in case of an emergency. Following successful completion, machine specific training will be provided by the Shop Supervisor to cover specific operating procedures and safety controls for machinery that may be used.
For more information, please visit the Shop Safety web page at http://ehs.columbia.edu/ShopSafety.html.

You’re doing what? With what? By Brian Anderson

Training is a fundamental element of a safe workplace, providing individuals the tools to identify hazards and develop proper work practices, as well as meeting regulatory requirements.  Before you or a new employee starts laboratory work, ensure that you or they are properly trained.  Several tools are available to help determine which training courses are needed for your research.  

  1. The Research Compliance Training Finder -http://www.columbia.edu/cu/compliance/docs/training/trainingfinder.html
  2. EH&S’s Training Requirement Matrix - http://www.ehs.columbia.edu/DeterminingYourSafetyTrainingRequirements.pdf.   

Both allow users to determine what training courses are needed based on their job function or the materials used in their lab.  Once the required courses are identified, directions on how to take the initial training and frequency requirements for when refresher trainings must be completed are also displayed. 

training Chart

In the example above from the Training Finder & Training Matrix, after inputting various job functions and chemical-specific information, the individual is directed to attend a live session for their initial Laboratory Safety & Hazardous Waste Management Training, and to complete either a live or computer-based refresher training every two years.  Please also be mindful that additional task or procedure-specific hands-on training must be provided by a PI or lab supervisor.    For live training monthly schedules or additional information on safety training, please visit: http://www.ehs.columbia.edu/Training.html

Fall is the time to get your seasonal influenza vaccine. Knock out the flu before it knocks out you!

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