I Smell Gas by Harry Oster

If you were to smell natural gas in your laboratory, what would you do? You should immediately turn off all ignition sources followed by a check all gas valves in the laboratory to ensure they are closed. While laboratories typically have adequate air exchange rates to prevent the build-up of dangerous concentrations of natural gas, if the space has operable
windows, it would be prudent to open the windows to help increase fresh air.
A gas outlet is identified by a blue colored circle on the top of the valve. In many labs, valves are located on the inside or
outside frame of a chemical fume hood (Fig. #1), on the laboratory bench (Figs. #2, 3), or both.
If the valve is of the lever type, ensure the valve is completely in the "off" position by checking that the lever handle is perpendicular to the discharge nozzle as shown in the photo (Fig. #3). If the shut off valve is of the cross handle type,
grasp the handle and turn completely to the right in a clockwise direction (Fig. #2).
If a natural gas odor is detected in a shared space, please be courteous and safety-conscious by checking ALL valves in the room – not just the valves in your work area. Some laboratories have many valves located along their workbenches, so be
aware of their locations to avoid unknowingly or accidently striking and opening the valve.
If the source of the leak cannot be quickly identified, evacuate the laboratory and call Public Safety and Facilities Operations to report the suspected gas leak.

Fig. #1 Fig. #2 Fig. #3

gas valve

gas valve

gas valve

gas valve

 
Fume hood gas valve (blue cap) Turn valve clockwise to close To close, make sure lever is perpendicular to nozzle, as shown  


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